While it would be ideal to schedule all of your oral healthcare before you get pregnant, that isn’t always possible. Tooth decay can be a complication of pregnancy and may require treatment that can’t be put off until after the birth of your baby. It’s also possible that an accident or trauma involving your teeth may require dental care. In these cases, The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists considers dental x-rays safe for pregnant women. 
 
Dental x-ray imaging is extremely safe. Modern dental radiograph tools and techniques are designed to limit your exposure to radiation drastically. 
 
The diagnostic capabilities of a low-radiation x-ray image are astounding. Dentists could not see or treat many dental issues without them. The digital images are a powerful tool allowing your dentist to treat unseen areas of your mouth, particularly beneath the gums in case of accident or trauma-related damage.
 
Lowering Radiation Exposure 
 
We use every reasonable precaution to minimize exposure. Your dentist will only recommend an x-ray if there isn’t a valid alternative for accurate dental assessment or diagnosis. 
 
Modern, state-of-the-art digital imaging technology emits 80% less radiation
X-ray machines are well-constructed and shielded so that radiation doesn’t occur outside the beam which is focused into a small shielded cone less than 3-inches in diameter. 
 
What You Can Do
 
Talk to your dentist about postponing routine dental x-rays if your oral health will allow it.  Some people may need X-rays as often as every six months. People who visit your South Organge family dentist regularly and have excellent oral health may need X-rays only every three years or so.
 
Seek out a dentist that uses digital imaging technology. It limits your radiation exposure dramatically and offers immediate viewing of the image and easy storage and recall for comparison. 
 
It’s always a good idea to use a leaded apron to minimize exposure and to let your dentist know that you are pregnant.
 
Risk factors for x-rays while pregnant
Accident or trauma involving teeth 
Pregnancy increases risk of tooth decay and pregnancy gingivitis
Severe morning sickness can damage teeth or inhibit proper oral care
Xerostomia, or dry mouth, is common during pregnancy and can affect oral health